B-52 cocktail recipe

Contents

Ingredients

  1. Kahlua – 20 ml

  2. Baileys – 20 ml

  3. Grand Marnier – 20 ml

How to make a cocktail

  1. Pour all the ingredients carefully and slowly in layers into a stack using a bar spoon.

  2. Burn the top layer.

  3. Drink quickly through a straw, starting from the bottom layer.

* Use the simple B-52 cocktail recipe to make your own unique mix at home. To do this, it is enough to replace the base alcohol with the one that is available.

B-52 video recipe

Cocktail B-52 (B-52)

The history of the B-52 cocktail

There are at least 2 main theories that shed some light on the origin of the B-52 cocktail.

The first and perhaps the closest theory to the truth is that the cocktail was created in honor of the US B-52 Stratofortress bomber, hence the original name of the cocktail.

The main weapon of the bomber was incendiary bombs. It is believed that this is why the “fiery” version of the B-52 appeared.

Another theory claims that the cocktail was created by Peter Fitch, head bartender at the Banff Springs Hotel in Banff, Alberta, Canada.

An interesting fact is that Peter named all his cocktails after his favorite bands, albums and songs.

However, the cocktail became widespread thanks to one of Peter’s clients, who at that time was buying up various restaurants in Alberta.

He liked the B-52 so much that he decided to popularize it through his chain of restaurants. This is why it is believed that the first B-52 shot appeared at the Keg Steakhouse in 1977.

In 2009, the B-52 became the drink of choice in North London; at the time, Arsenal FC striker Niklas Bendtner changed his jersey number from 26 to 52, thus earning the nickname “B52”.

After Niklas scored the winning goal in the match against Liverpool FC, all the bars “exploded” from the influx of people who wanted to drink the shot of the same name.

Cocktail variations B-52

  1. B-51 – with hazelnut liqueur instead of kahlua.

  2. B-52 Bomb Bay Doors – with gin bombay sapphire.

  3. B-52 in the Desert – with tequila instead of baylis.

  4. B-53 – with sambuca instead of baylis.

  5. B-54 – with amaretto instead of kalua.

  6. B-55 – with absinthe instead of kahlua, also known as the B-52 Gunship.

  7. B-57 – with mint schnapps instead of baileys.

B-52 video recipe

Cocktail B-52 (B-52)

The history of the B-52 cocktail

There are at least 2 main theories that shed some light on the origin of the B-52 cocktail.

The first and perhaps the closest theory to the truth is that the cocktail was created in honor of the US B-52 Stratofortress bomber, hence the original name of the cocktail.

The main weapon of the bomber was incendiary bombs. It is believed that this is why the “fiery” version of the B-52 appeared.

Another theory claims that the cocktail was created by Peter Fitch, head bartender at the Banff Springs Hotel in Banff, Alberta, Canada.

An interesting fact is that Peter named all his cocktails after his favorite bands, albums and songs.

However, the cocktail became widespread thanks to one of Peter’s clients, who at that time was buying up various restaurants in Alberta.

He liked the B-52 so much that he decided to popularize it through his chain of restaurants. This is why it is believed that the first B-52 shot appeared at the Keg Steakhouse in 1977.

In 2009, the B-52 became the drink of choice in North London; at the time, Arsenal FC striker Niklas Bendtner changed his jersey number from 26 to 52, thus earning the nickname “B52”.

After Niklas scored the winning goal in the match against Liverpool FC, all the bars “exploded” from the influx of people who wanted to drink the shot of the same name.

Cocktail variations B-52

  1. B-51 – with hazelnut liqueur instead of kahlua.

  2. B-52 Bomb Bay Doors – with gin bombay sapphire.

  3. B-52 in the Desert – with tequila instead of baylis.

  4. B-53 – with sambuca instead of baylis.

  5. B-54 – with amaretto instead of kalua.

  6. B-55 – with absinthe instead of kahlua, also known as the B-52 Gunship.

  7. B-57 – with mint schnapps instead of baileys.

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